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Vient de paraître : John Slight, The British Empire and the Hajj, 1865-1956, Harvard University Press, 2015

samedi 26 décembre 2015, par Dominique Taurisson-Mouret

  • 456 p. ISBN : 9780674504783 Price : 39,95 $

Présentation éditeur :

« The British Empire at its height governed more than half the world’s Muslims. It was a political imperative for the Empire to present itself to Muslims as a friend and protector, to take seriously what one scholar called its role as “the greatest Mohamedan power in the world.” Few tasks were more important than engagement with the pilgrimage to Mecca.
Every year, tens of thousands of Muslims set out for Mecca from imperial territories throughout Africa, the Middle East, and Asia, from the Atlantic Ocean to the South China Sea. Men and women representing all economic classes and scores of ethnic and linguistic groups made extraordinary journeys across waterways, deserts, and savannahs, creating huge challenges for officials charged with the administration of these pilgrims. They had to balance the religious obligation to travel against the desire to control the pilgrims’ movements, and they became responsible for the care of those who ran out of money. John Slight traces the Empire’s complex interactions with the Hajj from the 1860s, when an outbreak of cholera led Britain to engage reluctantly in medical regulation of pilgrims, to the Suez Crisis of 1956. The story draws on a varied cast of characters—Richard Burton, Thomas Cook, the Begums of Bhopal, Lawrence of Arabia, and frontline imperial officials, many of them Muslim—and gives voice throughout to the pilgrims themselves.
The British Empire and the Hajj is a crucial resource for understanding how this episode in imperial history was experienced by rulers and ruled alike. »

Table des matières

Map of places mentioned in the book
Introduction
1. Contexts
2. Pilgrimage in the Mid-Victorian Era, c. 1865–1900
3. Pilgrimage in the Edwardian Era, 1901–1914
4. The First World War and the Hashemite Interregnum, 1914–1924
5. Britain and the Hajj under Saudi Control, 1924–1939
6. Hajj from the Far Ends of Britain’s Muslim Empire, 1924–1939
Epilogue : Hajj in the Time of War and Decolonization, 1939–1956
Conclusion
Abbreviations
Notes
Glossary
Archival Sources
Acknowledgments
Index

John Slight is a Research Fellow in History at St. John’s College, University of Cambridge.

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